Archive for category Transmitters

Get Your Lesman Level Catalog!

Lesman 2016 Level MiniCatOur level products manufacturers have released several new instruments to make your measurement tasks easier, more efficient, and more effective. So, we’ve put together a new Lesman Level Products catalog to introduce you to the latest technology.

What’s inside?
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Viewing data logs in Excel format (Siemens LUT 400 Ultrasonic Level Controller)

Written by: Dan Weise

Siemens’ LUT 400 saves data values and alarm events in text-formatted log files. This note covers how to get the files out of the LUT400 to view them in spreadsheet format using Siemens Log Importer macro for Excel.
Lut 400 1

The text files are extracted from the LUT400 over a USB cable (mini B type connector).  When the USB cable is connected to your PC, the LUT400 appears as a removable drive (circled in red, below)

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Is it time to switch switches?

Eight problems with outdated, electromechanical switches and eight solutions that will come with a digital upgrade to your plant.

Operational VisibilityUE Electric Safety Transmitter

The Problem: Unless tested on a regular basis, there is no way to determine when a problem exists. With mechanical switches, the only way to diagnose a problem is to remove the switch, leaving the control or safety function
unprotected.

Solution: Newer digital switches have an LCD screen that shows local process variable measurements and integrated internal diagnostics directly on the screen. You can easily monitor the health of the device at a glance, without having to remove the switch from operation.

Adjustability

The Problem: Mechanical switches require careful adjustments for reaching desired setpoints. Additionally, once these adjustments are made, settings

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Solving installation problems for radar tank level transmitters

radar ellipse intersecting the tank wallRecently, we’ve run into a few radar level applications that had some startup challenges, mostly because the person installing the transmitter didn’t consider how radar wave transmission would affect the level transmitter’s performance.

One trick to any installation is to reduce the number of obstructions encountered by the transmitter. But you have to take into consideration that radar waves don’t transmit in a concentric circle around the transmitter. And this can create a problem of its own.

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Minimizing shift on a draft range differential pressure transmitter

A while ago, I got a call from a customer who was having trouble with a differential pressure transmitter. He was using a draft range DP transmitter to measure the pressure in a combustion chamber, so it could be controlled with a damper. He had one port connected to the combustion chamber with impulse tubing, and the other (low side) was left open to the atmosphere.

He’d noticed that when a fork truck or other vehicle sped past the furnace – the transmitter was mounted next to a traffic lane — it cause the furnace pressure to momentarily dip downward, and cause the damper to oscillate.

He figured out that the air movement provided by the passing vehicle was creating a momentary pressure pulse on the low side port. These air movements were creating difficulty in maintaining furnace pressure.

So, he asked me, “How can we dampen the effect of the momentary pressure pulse?”

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Tips for ranging a vacuum transmitter

0-30 vacuum pressure gaugeA process plant’s technician was mystified about how to get a typical gauge pressure transmitter to read in the vacuum range. “All our gauges are 0 to 30 inches mercury, and that’s what we need to transmitter output to be. But the transmitter you sent us just stays around 4mA when we pull a vacuum.”

We walked out to the reactor vessel to look at the installation. The transmitter’s Low side port was open, its high side port was plumbed into a tee along with a conventional bourdon tube pressure gauge reading gauge pressure vacuum.

I could see why he was confused. The mechanical gauge goes from 0 to 30. I asked what range he used to configure the pressure transmitter. His answer, “0 to 30 inches mercury, same as the mechanical gauge.”

So, what was happening?

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Using through-air radar on low dielectric materials in petroleum industry applications

Recently, a refinery customer came to use with a level application. Our team determined that it would be a perfect fit for radar level gauges, IF they turned on a Siemens radar algorithm called CLEF, that would let the radar measure accurately all the way to the bottom of the tank.

What is CLEF? How does it work? And why does it matter?

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