Posts Tagged liquid level

Get Your Lesman Level Catalog!

Our level products manufacturers have released several new instruments to make your measurement tasks easier, more efficient, and more effective. So, we’ve put together a new Lesman Level Products catalog to introduce you to the latest technology.
Level MiniCat
What’s inside?

  • The latest in continuous radar for use in liquids, solids, hygienic processes, or harsh environments
  • New continuous ultrasonics from Siemens
  • Hygienic level products from Siemens and Sartorius
  • New guided wave radar from Honeywell
  • Tips to help you find the perfect fit level instrumentation for your application


Sign up to receive your FREE copy of the new Lesman Level Measurement catalog.

Why wait? Download a digital copy now!


Need help finding the right instrument for your application? Fill out an application datasheet and send it to Lesman. We’ll make sure you get the right instruments for your process.

Prefer to speak to a member of our sales team?

Give us a call! (800) 953-7626


Lesman is the premiere stocking representative for process valving, controls, and measurement instrumentation, serving customers in Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Eastern Missouri, Eastern Iowa, and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

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Free Download: Siemens e-book Going the Distance – Solid Level Measurement with Radar

Written by: Dan Weise

A couple years ago, Siemens published a great handbook on using radar to measure solids levels, but the $60 price tag limited its readership.

You can now download the book for free as an electronic epub file formatted for electronic readers, which in my case, is the Firefox browser on my laptop.  It could be any browser (Internet Explorer or Chrome), or presumably any electronic book reader.

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Air Bubbler Systems: Old Faithful Liquid Level Measurement

In an ideal world there would be a perfect liquid level measurement system that would work for every liquid and every application.  Unfortunately, that product does not yet exist, leaving operators and technicians to go through the trial and error process of finding the level instrumentation that will work for them.

So in this high-tech world, is there still a need for the old faithful pneumatic systems like air bubblers?  The answer is YES!  Why? Because air bubbler systems work when other systems fail.

Air bubbler systems will work with the more difficult of liquids such as…

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Understanding Level Readings & the Truth about Level Measurement Instruments

In order to understand level readings, you must first comprehend how the instrument works. Three of the most common level-measuring techniques involve using a displacer, float, or differential pressure instrument.

Here’s the catch.

While each of these instruments can be used to report a level reading, none of them actually measure level.

I know what you’re thinking…

If none of these instruments measure level, how do we end up with a level reading? Read the rest of this entry »

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How to keep condensation from affecting Siemens ultrasonic level sensors

Recently, a customer noticed that the Siemens ultrasonic level measurement system he had installed in a storage bin showed a signficant amount of moisture buildup. At extreme temperature changes (like we’ve seen a lot latele here in the Midwest), there’d be moisture buildup on the Echomax ultrasonic transducer, sometimes so severely, they’d have problems from signal loss.

How could they fix it? One quick trip to the local big-box or auto supply store provided a Siemens-supported solution.


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The Impact of Background Echoes on Ultrasonic Level Measurement

Photography is a pretty good way to illustrate the importance of background.

Look at the two photographs here. In one, the background is minimal, and focuses your eye on the subject matter. In the other, the background seriously detracts from the subject. Where should you be focusing? What’s most important?

Non-intrusive background makes focus point clear

Hard to discerne the difference between the action and all the stuff happening in the background


But unlike photography, where a good background helps you focus on the subject, in the world of non-contact ultrasonic level measurement, even a “good” background has a negative influence.  Background never contributes to a level reading, it only detracts. But Siemens has a built-in function to “cure” for the influence of backgrounds in their level devices. Read the rest of this entry »

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February 2: A day to look back

Yesterday and today, people all over Chicago and the Midwest were looking at pictures from last year. We had 22″ of snowfall in one day. The roads were closed. The airports were closed. Even the Lesman offices were closed. And today’s weather forecast? 45°… in Chicago… in February.

This morning in Pennsylvania, a groundhog named Phil came out, looked back, and saw… his shadow.

All this looking back made me a little reflective myself. I’ve been writing this blog for about 6 months now. So I thought I’d take a minute and recap the articles people keep coming back to read:

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