Posts Tagged commissioning

The Impact of Background Echoes on Ultrasonic Level Measurement

Photography is a pretty good way to illustrate the importance of background.

Look at the two photographs here. In one, the background is minimal, and focuses your eye on the subject matter. In the other, the background seriously detracts from the subject. Where should you be focusing? What’s most important?

Non-intrusive background makes focus point clear

Hard to discerne the difference between the action and all the stuff happening in the background

 

But unlike photography, where a good background helps you focus on the subject, in the world of non-contact ultrasonic level measurement, even a “good” background has a negative influence.  Background never contributes to a level reading, it only detracts. But Siemens has a built-in function to “cure” for the influence of backgrounds in their level devices. Read the rest of this entry »

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Radar vs Ultrasonic Level Calibration Points (The Devil’s in the Details)

People who have used Milltronics or Siemens ultrasonic continuous level measurement systems are used to the way configuration is done.  It’s not uncommon that when they start up their first Siemens radar transmitter they encounter a stumbling block – the 4-20mA output doesn’t respond correctly. 

The radar will start up and run, and if the tank level is low, they’ll get a valid level reading on the transmitter’s display, but the 4-20mA will be incorrect (too high a percentage).  Or, if the tank level is at a medium or high level, both the indicated level in the display and the output will be maxed out at 20mA.   It’s a misunderstanding about where the span measurement starts from. Read the rest of this entry »

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Repair or replace? Which should I do?

It’s a common question that doesn’t come with a straightforward answer. Our customers make a significant investment in instrumentation, so if something can be repaired, it’s usually easier to get past the budget department.  But there are several factors to consider first.   Read the rest of this entry »

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