Archive for category WIKA

Chemical Seal Assemblies Available from Lesman Stock

Chemical seals and fills are often necessary to protect your process instrumentation from harm. But the wait for a custom gauge-and-seal, switch-and-seal, or transmitter-and-seal combination could be an issue, keeping your process offline for longer than necessary, or costing a premium for quick delivery.

We’ve removed the potential for downtime and rush charges with our WIKA-certified assembly station, and improved stock of most popular transmitters, switches, gauges, diaphragm seals, and fill fluids. Lesman customers can experience next-day delivery on custom assemblies from in-stock instrumentation.

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Get Your Lesman Level Catalog!

Lesman 2016 Level MiniCatOur level products manufacturers have released several new instruments to make your measurement tasks easier, more efficient, and more effective. So, we’ve put together a new Lesman Level Products catalog to introduce you to the latest technology.

What’s inside?
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Understanding Level Readings & the Truth about Level Measurement Instruments

In order to understand level readings, you must first comprehend how the instrument works. Three of the most common level-measuring techniques involve using a displacer, float, or differential pressure instrument.

Here’s the catch.

While each of these instruments can be used to report a level reading, none of them actually measure level.

I know what you’re thinking…

If none of these instruments measure level, how do we end up with a level reading? Read the rest of this entry »

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Tips for ranging a vacuum transmitter

0-30 vacuum pressure gaugeA process plant’s technician was mystified about how to get a typical gauge pressure transmitter to read in the vacuum range. “All our gauges are 0 to 30 inches mercury, and that’s what we need to transmitter output to be. But the transmitter you sent us just stays around 4mA when we pull a vacuum.”

We walked out to the reactor vessel to look at the installation. The transmitter’s Low side port was open, its high side port was plumbed into a tee along with a conventional bourdon tube pressure gauge reading gauge pressure vacuum.

I could see why he was confused. The mechanical gauge goes from 0 to 30. I asked what range he used to configure the pressure transmitter. His answer, “0 to 30 inches mercury, same as the mechanical gauge.”

So, what was happening?

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Using a wireless radio battery to power a pressure transmitter

In an ideal world, every place you need to install a transmitter would have easy access to electrical power. But we don’t live in the ideal world, and there are locations where power isn’t readily available, and getting electrical power to those areas can be quite costly.

This was the situation at a local plant, in their flammable fuel storage facility. The site is required to keep a record of the line pressure that supplies water in the event of a fire.

The Problem

The water pipe is located 6 to 7 feet (2 meters) below grade, and the engineers planned to build a vault where they could install and maintain the necessary submersible pressure transmitter.

The planned location is more than 500 yards from any available power source. The signal coming from the pressure transmitter would have to run that distance plus an additional 200 yards to reach the control room.

Not surprising, the trenching cost for an electrical installation was quoted at a five-figure minimum price.

Finding a solution

The project engineer started considering a wireless solution, and then asked, “Can a battery-powered industrial radio also power a two-wire loop-powered pressure transmitter?”

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Should I use a chemical seal with my pressure instruments?

Diaphragm seal mounts directly into the process linke to reduce damage to the Bourdon tube.Pressure instruments in contact with the process can take a real beating. Process fluids can corrode the wetted parts and destroy the sensing element.  Media the solidifies can clog the pressure-sensing port.  Or, an installed instrument can affect the process by providing a spot for media remnants to remain after cleaning and purging. Specialized chemical seals deal with these pressure sensing issues.

Here’s a list of questions to ask about your application that will determine if you need a chemical seal with your gauge, switch, or transmitter.

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How do you keep production going when a control thermocouple burns out?

There’s no such thing as a fail-proof thermocouple. Over time, thermocouples fail. To compensate for that, a temperature controller will normally go into upscale burnout mode, and drive the furnace burner to low fire or turn down the SCRs.  But then, you have to deal with the downtime, rework, or even the potential of losing product.

Not long ago, a plant operator called to see if there we had a way to work around this burnout mode, so he wasn’t wasting time and materials.

His heat treat load had almost finished its final soak when the control thermocouple broke open. The controller, as expected, drove the furnace burner to low fire. The operator then popped the controller into manual mode, so he could nurse the load through the remainder of its soak cycle. He used the temperature reading on a recorder, fed from a second, unbroken thermocouple in the protection tube as temperature indication for the load.

If the situation had happened in the middle of the night, it may not have been handled with the same attention the day-shift operator had provided.

So, he asked if there was any way to have the controller automatically “fail over” to a second thermocouple. 

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