Archive for category WIKA

Chemical Seal Assemblies Available from Lesman Stock

Chemical seals and fills are often necessary to protect your process instrumentation from harm. But the wait for a custom gauge-and-seal, switch-and-seal, or transmitter-and-seal combination could be an issue, keeping your process offline for longer than necessary, or costing a premium for quick delivery.

We’ve removed the potential for downtime and rush charges with our WIKA-certified assembly station, and improved stock of most popular transmitters, switches, gauges, diaphragm seals, and fill fluids. Lesman customers can experience next-day delivery on custom assemblies from in-stock instrumentation.

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Get Your Lesman Level Catalog!

Lesman 2016 Level MiniCatOur level products manufacturers have released several new instruments to make your measurement tasks easier, more efficient, and more effective. So, we’ve put together a new Lesman Level Products catalog to introduce you to the latest technology.

What’s inside?
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Understanding Level Readings & the Truth about Level Measurement Instruments

In order to understand level readings, you must first comprehend how the instrument works. Three of the most common level-measuring techniques involve using a displacer, float, or differential pressure instrument.

Here’s the catch.

While each of these instruments can be used to report a level reading, none of them actually measure level.

I know what you’re thinking…

If none of these instruments measure level, how do we end up with a level reading? Read the rest of this entry »

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Tips for ranging a vacuum transmitter

0-30 vacuum pressure gaugeA process plant’s technician was mystified about how to get a typical gauge pressure transmitter to read in the vacuum range. “All our gauges are 0 to 30 inches mercury, and that’s what we need to transmitter output to be. But the transmitter you sent us just stays around 4mA when we pull a vacuum.”

We walked out to the reactor vessel to look at the installation. The transmitter’s Low side port was open, its high side port was plumbed into a tee along with a conventional bourdon tube pressure gauge reading gauge pressure vacuum.

I could see why he was confused. The mechanical gauge goes from 0 to 30. I asked what range he used to configure the pressure transmitter. His answer, “0 to 30 inches mercury, same as the mechanical gauge.”

So, what was happening?

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