Archive for category Measurement

Air Bubbler Systems: Old Faithful Liquid Level Measurement

In an ideal world there would be a perfect liquid level measurement system that would work for every liquid and every application.  Unfortunately, that product does not yet exist, leaving operators and technicians to go through the trial and error process of finding the level instrumentation that will work for them.

So in this high-tech world, is there still a need for the old faithful pneumatic systems like air bubblers?  The answer is YES!  Why? Because air bubbler systems work when other systems fail.

Air bubbler systems will work with the more difficult of liquids such as…

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How to Measure Thermal Energy

As energy costs and environmental concerns continue to rise, we count on our facility managers to take control of building/factory energy consumption. To reduce their companies’ carbon footprints, facility managers have begun implementing energy management programs to control their systems, optimize efficiency, and manage expenses.

But how are they doing it?

Let’s say you are trying to cool your facility. There are two steps to determining how much energy is consumed in the process. Read the rest of this entry »

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Understanding Level Readings & the Truth about Level Measurement Instruments

In order to understand level readings, you must first comprehend how the instrument works. Three of the most common level-measuring techniques involve using a displacer, float, or differential pressure instrument.

Here’s the catch.

While each of these instruments can be used to report a level reading, none of them actually measure level.

I know what you’re thinking…

If none of these instruments measure level, how do we end up with a level reading? Read the rest of this entry »

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Does ultrasonic level measurement work with a standpipe?

The easy answer: Yes.

But in a recent webinar on choosing the best level technology for your application, the more specific answer is this: Yes, AS LONG AS you pay attention to the unit specs and a pretty simple rule of thumb.

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How to keep condensation from affecting Siemens ultrasonic level sensors

Recently, a customer noticed that the Siemens ultrasonic level measurement system he had installed in a storage bin showed a signficant amount of moisture buildup. At extreme temperature changes (like we’ve seen a lot latele here in the Midwest), there’d be moisture buildup on the Echomax ultrasonic transducer, sometimes so severely, they’d have problems from signal loss.

How could they fix it? One quick trip to the local big-box or auto supply store provided a Siemens-supported solution.

 

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Comparing Honeywell smart transmitters

Honeywell ST800 Smartline TransmitterHoneywell’s new SmartLine ST700 and ST800 pressure transmitter lines are replacing the existing ST3000 100 and 900 series.

If you’re using ST3000 100 series transmitters, you’ll be looking at the ST800 for future units.  If you’re using the ST3000 900 series, the ST700 will be your better fit.

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How do I get an RTD signal to two different devices?

RTDs are great temperature sensors – accurate and easy to install.  But they are not friendly when it comes to trying to get a single RTD to go to two places, like when an RTD temperature measurement has to go to both a controller and a recorder.  People call and ask, “How do I split an RTD signal?”  The short answer is, “You can’t.”

An RTD cannot be wired in parallel or in series to a second device.  Any RTD input supplies a known, regulated ‘excitation’ current to the RTD.  Mixing RTD inputs would mix currents and that’s a Big No-No.

There’s also a lead wire compensation circuit for 3- or 4-wire RTDs that would create problems if a single RTD were connected to two different RTD inputs.  There’s just no feasible means of making two RTD analog inputs play nice together.

But all is not lost. There are several ways to achieve your goal.

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