Archive for category siemens

Tips for ranging a vacuum transmitter

0-30 vacuum pressure gaugeA process plant’s technician was mystified about how to get a typical gauge pressure transmitter to read in the vacuum range. “All our gauges are 0 to 30 inches mercury, and that’s what we need to transmitter output to be. But the transmitter you sent us just stays around 4mA when we pull a vacuum.”

We walked out to the reactor vessel to look at the installation. The transmitter’s Low side port was open, its high side port was plumbed into a tee along with a conventional bourdon tube pressure gauge reading gauge pressure vacuum.

I could see why he was confused. The mechanical gauge goes from 0 to 30. I asked what range he used to configure the pressure transmitter. His answer, “0 to 30 inches mercury, same as the mechanical gauge.”

So, what was happening?

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Does ultrasonic level measurement work with a standpipe?

The easy answer: Yes.

But in a recent webinar on choosing the best level technology for your application, the more specific answer is this: Yes, AS LONG AS you pay attention to the unit specs and a pretty simple rule of thumb.

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Using through-air radar on low dielectric materials in petroleum industry applications

Recently, a refinery customer came to use with a level application. Our team determined that it would be a perfect fit for radar level gauges, IF they turned on a Siemens radar algorithm called CLEF, that would let the radar measure accurately all the way to the bottom of the tank.

What is CLEF? How does it work? And why does it matter?

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How to keep condensation from affecting Siemens ultrasonic level sensors

Recently, a customer noticed that the Siemens ultrasonic level measurement system he had installed in a storage bin showed a signficant amount of moisture buildup. At extreme temperature changes (like we’ve seen a lot latele here in the Midwest), there’d be moisture buildup on the Echomax ultrasonic transducer, sometimes so severely, they’d have problems from signal loss.

How could they fix it? One quick trip to the local big-box or auto supply store provided a Siemens-supported solution.

 

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