Archive for category configuration

Making a Siemens clamp-on flowmeter setup record easy to read

Everyone agrees that it’s good practice to keep a record of configurations and setups for any field instrument. I’m constantly recommending it to our customers for their transmitters, controllers, recorders, and other complex configurable devices.

Siemens clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeters even have a system in place to make this process easy. By connecting the meter to a PC through the RS-232 serial port, you can use a terminal program and the SITE command to fetch a data file that holds all the instrument’s configuration data.

The terminal program can also be used — with a set of instructions specific to the flowmeter — for viewing real-time operational data, performing device setup, uploading logger data, or uploading configurations known as SITE setups.

Recently, I was called to visit a plant and look at a misbehaving flowmeter. From previous discussions with the operator, I knew he’d saved SITE setup files for every flowmeter installed in the plant.

I asked if the customer would e-mail me the setup file before my visit, so I could check out how the flowmeter was set up. My request was met with a chuckle and “Well, if you really think it’s worth it…”

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How to pick a setpoint profile program on a Honeywell UDC3500 controller

Honeywell UDC3500 universal digital controllerYou’ve heard this phrase before: “It’s simple. But nobody said it would be easy.”

And this is exactly one of those cases.

The Honeywell UDC3500 digital controller can support up to four setpoint programs, the ramp/soak profiles used in batch control operations. But after configuring all four profiles, I was stuck on how to select the one I wanted the controller to use.

There’s no “Program Select” button on the keypad. So I was mystified on how I was going to select my setpoint profile program #3.

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Solving installation problems for radar tank level transmitters

radar ellipse intersecting the tank wallRecently, we’ve run into a few radar level applications that had some startup challenges, mostly because the person installing the transmitter didn’t consider how radar wave transmission would affect the level transmitter’s performance.

One trick to any installation is to reduce the number of obstructions encountered by the transmitter. But you have to take into consideration that radar waves don’t transmit in a concentric circle around the transmitter. And this can create a problem of its own.

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Marking Charts on Honeywell Paperless Process Recorders

Back in the day of paper charts, it was simple to mark a recorder chart – the operator pulled a pen out of his pocket and wrote on the chart, or the quality person rubber-stamped the chart.

Even with “paperless” charts on Honeywell’s Trendview, X-Series and G-Series digital recorders, it’s still easy to annotate.

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Using through-air radar on low dielectric materials in petroleum industry applications

Recently, a refinery customer came to use with a level application. Our team determined that it would be a perfect fit for radar level gauges, IF they turned on a Siemens radar algorithm called CLEF, that would let the radar measure accurately all the way to the bottom of the tank.

What is CLEF? How does it work? And why does it matter?

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Honeywell smart transmitter design makes communication card swap easy

It was bound to happen sooner or later.

I took a call from a customer who needed to replace a garden variety differential pressure transmitter… with one exception: He needed Honeywell’s DE digital protocol for communicating to his DCS. The DE protocol is still great, but since so many installations today use HART or Foundation Fieldbus, all of our in-stock pressure transmitters had a HART communication card – a critical mismatch to what the customer needed.

A year ago, we would have been stuck rush-ordering a unit from the factory, with all the attendant delays and expediting charges, because you couldn’t swap out a comms card without making the transmitter’s hazardous approval invalid.

What could we do?
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Wet rhymes with Set (or how to remember LRV/URV configuration prompts)

Lots of people like the pushbuttons on industrial pressure transmitters because the basic settings that every transmitter needs can be set up without a HART communicator. This includes things like the tag name, engineering units, LRV (Lower Range Value, the zero, or what 4.0mA represents), URV (Upper Range Value, the span, or what 20.0mA represents) and damping (an average or filter factor that dampens noise).

Honeywell ST700 ST800 configuration screenOn the new Honeywell ST700/ST800 series smart transmitters, the tag name and engineering units are easy to configure and self explanatory, but I seem to stumble when setting up the LRV and URV because I’m faced with a non-descript choice. There’s two sets of options (under Transmitter Setup, not Calibration):

Enter LRV
Enter URV
Set LRV
Set URV

OK, either configures an LRV or a URV value, but which is which?  What’s the difference?

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