Archive for category batch control

How to pick a setpoint profile program on a Honeywell UDC3500 controller

Honeywell UDC3500 universal digital controllerYou’ve heard this phrase before: “It’s simple. But nobody said it would be easy.”

And this is exactly one of those cases.

The Honeywell UDC3500 digital controller can support up to four setpoint programs, the ramp/soak profiles used in batch control operations. But after configuring all four profiles, I was stuck on how to select the one I wanted the controller to use.

There’s no “Program Select” button on the keypad. So I was mystified on how I was going to select my setpoint profile program #3.

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Tested and proven: Honeywell PIE software reads and writes do not affect a UDC controller’s output

A customer has several UDC 3200 loop controllers with newly added Ethernet cards.   He needed to configure each of the controllers’ IP addresses using Honeywell Process Instrument Explorer (PIE) software.  Because the controllers are working in a 24×7 continuous process, he was concerned about how making those changes would affect each controller’s performance.

So he asked me:  Would a PIE action of uploading config files from or downloading them back to a controller affect the controller’s performance?

In the past, I’d only ever changed a controller’s IP address when it was on my workbench, not when it was actively controlling a process. So I’d never paid attention to whether PIE communications would affect the controller’s output or its PID action. Since I couldn’t answer the question, I told the customer I’d run a test to find out for sure.

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How can I use a controller to detect thermocouple drift?

If you use thermocouples in high-temperature applications, you’re aware of the issues thermocouple drift can cause. Thermocouples drift. It’s not a question of IF, it’s a question of WHEN. And thermocouple drift costs processors time and money in processing errors, waste, downtime, and lost production.

Thermocouple drift occurs due to metallurgical changes of the metal alloy elements over the extended use of the sensor. Thermocouples can drift by as much as several degrees per year.

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How to get a USB barcode scanner to read into a Honeywell paperless recorder

This is the error message I got when I tried using a USB barcode scanner with my Honeywell Trendview X-Series paperless recorderEarlier this week, I was working with one of our Honeywell Trendview X-series paperless recorders. The X-Series is capable of accepting data input from a USB barcode scanner — typically used for batch identification or for user name logins — but mine wasn’t working right.

When I tried to scan a barcode, I got an error message, and it stumped me. Luckily, I figured it out in a few minutes.

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How do I tune a process control loop?

Industry surveys say that nearly half of all processes aren’t accurately tuned. If you read my post on accuracy, stability, and repeatability, you’ll know that a poorly tuned process can result in bad readings, downtime, and wasted materials.

If you use a Honeywell UDC2500, UDC3200, or UDC3500 1/4 DIN universal digital controller, there’s a great built-in function called Accutune that can help make sure your control process is properly tuned.

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How do you keep production going when a control thermocouple burns out?

There’s no such thing as a fail-proof thermocouple. Over time, thermocouples fail. To compensate for that, a temperature controller will normally go into upscale burnout mode, and drive the furnace burner to low fire or turn down the SCRs.  But then, you have to deal with the downtime, rework, or even the potential of losing product.

Not long ago, a plant operator called to see if there we had a way to work around this burnout mode, so he wasn’t wasting time and materials.

His heat treat load had almost finished its final soak when the control thermocouple broke open. The controller, as expected, drove the furnace burner to low fire. The operator then popped the controller into manual mode, so he could nurse the load through the remainder of its soak cycle. He used the temperature reading on a recorder, fed from a second, unbroken thermocouple in the protection tube as temperature indication for the load.

If the situation had happened in the middle of the night, it may not have been handled with the same attention the day-shift operator had provided.

So, he asked if there was any way to have the controller automatically “fail over” to a second thermocouple. 

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